Quitclaim Deeds: The Fastest Way to Transfer Your Property

If you are in a serious accident from which doctors say there is no hope of recovery or you are facing a terminal illness, would you want life-prolonging measures? If you are incapacitated and unable to communicate your wishes, how will health care providers and family members know what you would want done? 

With a Living Will, the people you trust will have your direct, legally binding instructions for end-of-life care, so you get the treatment you desire, while also removing the burden and potential guilt such a difficult decision could cause your loved ones.

What is a Living Will?

A Living Will is a legal document that allows you to dictate certain end-of-life care and life-prolonging steps. Unlike a traditional will, a Living Will does not involve your estate, property, or finances in any way. Instead, it simply directs end-of-life medical care and outlines your wishes in a legal manner.

Why Do I Need a Living Will?

There are many reasons to create a Living Will. The most important, however, is that you remain in control of your medical choices even while you are unable to physically do so. If you have strong wishes for end-of-life care, such as a no-resuscitation order, these desires can be written down in your Living Will. 

This legally binding document also provides peace for your loved ones. When someone is facing a terminal illness or life-ending injury, families are often torn between medical treatments. There may be arguments over which choices to make; a Living Will, though, can end the stress and remove your family from the pain of making a difficult, emotionally taxing decision. With a Living Will, you can end in-family fighting before it even starts. 

Perhaps you have already discussed potential end-of-life scenarios with a loved one. These conversations, however, are not legally binding. With a legal document, your friends and family can see, in clear language, how medical staff should proceed.

Create a Valid Living Will with the Messina Law Group

Florida law requires your Living Will to be prepared with certain formalities to be valid. If your Living Will is not valid, your instructions may not be honored. In Florida, a Living Will must be in writing and signed by you. The signing must be witnessed by two people, and at least one of the witnesses cannot be a spouse or relative. 

After signing your Living Will, it can be delivered to your physician, health care provider and/or your health care surrogate. With this step, the medical staff and facility will have clear, legally-binding instructions for your care. 

When you have a Living Will, you can rest assured knowing family will know exactly how to proceed. When you use Messina Law Group, you can rest assured knowing it was prepared right. Contact the Messina Law Group today and let us create a proper, binding Living Will right away.